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Annapolis Fire Department


Fire Chief

David L. Stokes, Sr.


Contact Person:

Kenneth White
Email: afd-pio@annapolis.gov
Phone: 410-263-7975



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Annapolis Fire Department Media Release



The Annapolis Fire Department Urges all to

Beat the Heat-Summertime Safety

 

Its hot time summer in the city, and many are enjoying the fun outdoors, swimming, sailing, and sunbathing.While enjoying these fun activities, the Annapolis Fire Department wants all citizens to be, mindful of the heat, the dangers associated with the heat, and how to protect yourself fromhyperthermia. With temperatures soaring into the 100's this type of heat can place a tremendous strain on the body. So here are some tips to help you enjoy your summer safely:



  • Stay in the shade, as trees provide welcome shade;
  • If you head to the beach, be sure to bring an umbrella;
  • Wear sunscreen and lightweight, light-colored clothing to reflect some of the sun’s energy;
  • Drink plenty of water even if you do not feel thirsty. Limit alcohol, and sugary drinks which speed dehydration;
  • Slow down. Avoid exertion during the hottest part of the day. If you must do strenuous activity, do it during the coolest part of the day – in the morning between 4 and 7 a.m. or in the evening between 4 and 7 p.m
  • Eat small meals and eat more often.
  • Stay indoors in air-conditioning as much as possible;
  • If your home is not air-conditioned, spend at least two hours daily at an air-conditioned location; visit with a friend or neighbor or take a trip to the mall or other public place;
  • Take a cool shower or bath;
  • Never leave children or pets alone in the car, and
  • Be a good neighbor; check on elderly and special needs individuals in your community.
  • If you end up taking your dog for a walk during the warm part of the day, be sure to stay in the grass, and avoid the pavement. Stay away from sidewalks and or any pavement to avoid burning. A shady park can be a great place to walk your dog.

"Heat related emergencies can and will occur if proper precaution is not taken" says Annapolis Spokesperson Ken White. Below are emergencies that can occur from the heat exposure as well as how to identify the signs and symptoms, and what to do if you or someone you know experiences a heat related emergency. 


 Heat Stroke

This is the most serious type of heat emergency. It is Life-threatening and requires immediate and aggressive treatment. heat stroke occurs when the body’s heat regulating mechanism fails. The body temperature is elevated so high that brain damage and death may result unless the body is cooled rapidly .

 

Signs & symptoms

Early signs of this are headache, dizziness, delirium, weakness, nausea and vomiting.

The skin becomes hot, red and usually dry, pupils are very small, and the body temperature is extremely high, sometimes as high as 105 degrees.

 

First Aid 

  • Remember, Heat Stroke is a Life-threatening emergency and requires prompt action. Call 911 immediately! 
  • Get the victim into a cool place as soon as possible. 
  • Cool the victim as quickly as possible in any manner possible. 
  • Place the victim into a bathtub of cool water; wrap the individual in wet sheets; and if at all possible, place the victim in an air conditioned room. Do not give anything by mouth.

 

HEAT EXHAUSTION 

Heat exhaustion is less dangerous than heat stroke. It is caused by fluid loss which in turn causes blood flow to decrease in vital organs, resulting in a form of shock.

 

Signs & Symptoms

The heat exhaustion victim will exhibit cool, pale, and moist skin, heavy sweating, dilated pupils (wide), headache, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and perhaps a tingling in the arms and legs. The body temperature will be near normal.

 

First Aid for this type emergency would include:

  • Get the victim into a cool place
  • Place the victim on his/her back with both feet raised
  • Remove or loosen clothing of the victim
  • Cool the victim by fanning or applying cold packs or wet towels or sheets
  • If conscious, give the victim water to drink every 15 minutes

 

IMPORTANT: While heat exhaustion is not as life-threatening of an emergency as heat stroke, it can progress to heat stroke if left untreated! It is imperative that the individual receive medical care. Let a medical professional make the decision.

 

HEAT CRAMPS

Heat cramps are muscular pain and spasms due to heavy exertion. They usually involve the abdominal muscles or legs. It is generally thought this condition is caused by loss of water and salt through sweating.

 

First Aid

  • Move the victim to a cool place. 
  • If they can tolerate it, give one-half glass of water every 15 minutes. 

Heat cramps can usually be avoided by increasing fluid intake when active in hot weather. If these symptoms continue, call 911 immediately.

 

For more information on the dangers of heat and heat related emergencies, visit the Center for Disease Control (CDC) at http://www.cdc.gov. Please have a safe and enjoyable summer.


End of Release (Ken White #400)


The Annapolis Fire Department Urges all to

Beat the Heat-Summertime Safety

 

Its hot time summer in the city, and many are enjoying the fun outdoors, swimming, sailing, and sunbathing.While enjoying these fun activities, the Annapolis Fire Department wants all citizens to be, mindful of the heat, the dangers associated with the heat, and how to protect yourself fromhyperthermia. With temperatures soaring into the 100's this type of heat can place a tremendous strain on the body. So here are some tips to help you enjoy your summer safely:



  • Stay in the shade, as trees provide welcome shade;
  • If you head to the beach, be sure to bring an umbrella;
  • Wear sunscreen and lightweight, light-colored clothing to reflect some of the sun’s energy;
  • Drink plenty of water even if you do not feel thirsty. Limit alcohol, and sugary drinks which speed dehydration;
  • Slow down. Avoid exertion during the hottest part of the day. If you must do strenuous activity, do it during the coolest part of the day – in the morning between 4 and 7 a.m. or in the evening between 4 and 7 p.m
  • Eat small meals and eat more often.
  • Stay indoors in air-conditioning as much as possible;
  • If your home is not air-conditioned, spend at least two hours daily at an air-conditioned location; visit with a friend or neighbor or take a trip to the mall or other public place;
  • Take a cool shower or bath;
  • Never leave children or pets alone in the car, and
  • Be a good neighbor; check on elderly and special needs individuals in your community.
  • If you end up taking your dog for a walk during the warm part of the day, be sure to stay in the grass, and avoid the pavement. Stay away from sidewalks and or any pavement to avoid burning. A shady park can be a great place to walk your dog.

"Heat related emergencies can and will occur if proper precaution is not taken" says Annapolis Spokesperson Ken White. Below are emergencies that can occur from the heat exposure as well as how to identify the signs and symptoms, and what to do if you or someone you know experiences a heat related emergency. 


 Heat Stroke

This is the most serious type of heat emergency. It is Life-threatening and requires immediate and aggressive treatment. heat stroke occurs when the body’s heat regulating mechanism fails. The body temperature is elevated so high that brain damage and death may result unless the body is cooled rapidly .

 

Signs & symptoms

Early signs of this are headache, dizziness, delirium, weakness, nausea and vomiting.

The skin becomes hot, red and usually dry, pupils are very small, and the body temperature is extremely high, sometimes as high as 105 degrees.

 

First Aid 

  • Remember, Heat Stroke is a Life-threatening emergency and requires prompt action. Call 911 immediately! 
  • Get the victim into a cool place as soon as possible. 
  • Cool the victim as quickly as possible in any manner possible. 
  • Place the victim into a bathtub of cool water; wrap the individual in wet sheets; and if at all possible, place the victim in an air conditioned room. Do not give anything by mouth.

 

HEAT EXHAUSTION 

Heat exhaustion is less dangerous than heat stroke. It is caused by fluid loss which in turn causes blood flow to decrease in vital organs, resulting in a form of shock.

 

Signs & Symptoms

The heat exhaustion victim will exhibit cool, pale, and moist skin, heavy sweating, dilated pupils (wide), headache, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and perhaps a tingling in the arms and legs. The body temperature will be near normal.

 

First Aid for this type emergency would include:

  • Get the victim into a cool place
  • Place the victim on his/her back with both feet raised
  • Remove or loosen clothing of the victim
  • Cool the victim by fanning or applying cold packs or wet towels or sheets
  • If conscious, give the victim water to drink every 15 minutes

 

IMPORTANT: While heat exhaustion is not as life-threatening of an emergency as heat stroke, it can progress to heat stroke if left untreated! It is imperative that the individual receive medical care. Let a medical professional make the decision.

 

HEAT CRAMPS

Heat cramps are muscular pain and spasms due to heavy exertion. They usually involve the abdominal muscles or legs. It is generally thought this condition is caused by loss of water and salt through sweating.

 

First Aid

  • Move the victim to a cool place. 
  • If they can tolerate it, give one-half glass of water every 15 minutes. 

Heat cramps can usually be avoided by increasing fluid intake when active in hot weather. If these symptoms continue, call 911 immediately.

 

For more information on the dangers of heat and heat related emergencies, visit the Center for Disease Control (CDC) at http://www.cdc.gov. Please have a safe and enjoyable summer.


End of Release (Ken White #400)


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